About jlheuer

Jeanne: artist, teacher, retired librarian Curt: artist, cook, gardener, retired art professor

My Little Free Library: Retired, Relocated, Renewed

Wednesday, I said goodbye to my Little Free Library. ( To learn all about Little Free Libraries and see when mine first went out, read this earlier post ). It first went up in June of 2012 on a rural road in the Town of Scott in Wisconsin. Use at first was slow but then we would get the occasional person out for a walk or some kids on bikes. I put a sign at the road with an arrow so people were aware of its existence. Soon a car would stop and books weren’t just taken but dropped off as well. I kept track of what went out and tried to stock my library with a variety to please different tastes. But when you can only get a maximum of 30 books into your little box at one time that variety is slim. Still I would “circulate ” 40 – 50 books in a good year.

The trouble with being on a rural road in Wisconsin is the winter. Because of snowplows my Little Free Library went into storage from November through April, prime reading time for most people in the winter. This spring/summer has been the worst. Maybe 15 books went out and 3 or 4 were dropped off. I had to admit it was time to retire my precious LFL. Two years ago I had redesigned and repainted the library and Curt had come up with a new base idea so I was sure I would have no trouble finding a new steward. Using Facebook as my notice board I found a taker in a few minutes. But when that person discovered it would be difficult to put it on her property and had to decline, it only took about 5 more minutes before the 2nd hand went up. So this past Wednesday we took it down and loaded LFL #1776 into the SUV.

Retirement

The new owner was only 5 minutes away and she had a friend who was handy.

Relocation

On Thursday, the very next day, it was resurrected at its new home. We sent along good visual instructions so once the base was level it went up quickly. The neighbor children immediately came over to help put the books in.

Renewal

The road it is on is called Bay Settlement and it is fairly busy with cars but also bikes and joggers, and scooters, so I expect it will be used and loved. If you live on that road, pay it a visit, I gave the new owner a box of books but she has a lot of her own so it should have a fairly lively collection. It is so close I’ll probably visit it too. Oh, and drop off a book once in awhile too.

 

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What did you do Today?

Or what did you do all day? This was a question that we got a lot when we first retired. Usually when asked this I go blank. I know I didn’t just sit around (though that occurs), or take a nap (Curt does like to nap) or read ( yep, everyday), but what exactly did I do with the rest of the time? Well here goes, not a typical day but close.

I am not an early riser but I did want to go to the Farmer’s Market yesterday morning and Curt promised he wasn’t planning on being out the door at 7am. So we were up at 8 am and out the door by 8:20 am. We found a good parking space (yes, it is much more crowded when you get there a bit later) and hit the market. Four bags later we had mushrooms, zucchini, butternut squash, eggs, raddichio, peppers, cilantro, Spartan apples, carrots, eggplant, baby pattypan squashes, blueberry kringle (our breakfast) and apricots. Home by 9:30 where we made coffee and ate the kringle.

Apples, squash and apricots from Farmer’s Market

Once home I got the first of two loads of laundry in the washer. Curt started working on his chicken which was to be smoked. I got the miscellaneous dishes cleaned up and loaded the rest in the dishwasher. By now it is close to lunchtime. After lunch I got the last load into the dryer and went off to printmaking workshop over at the university. Last weekend we were part of a huge printing project ( 26 artists, each doing a 7″x7″ woodblock of a letter of the alphabet. These were put together into one huge print.) This week the print studio was open to anyone who wanted to do shorter individual prints using the same letters. I did three prints. You may notice I made a rookie mistake on one of the prints. Yes, the word DRIB was supposed to be BIRD. Whoops!  Later I’m cutting the letters apart.

Top: HEUER (read vertically). Middle: Individual letters/symbol RX@X Bottom: DRIB (Bird backwards)

Once home again, I saw Curt had potatoes on to boil and he had already smoked a pile of chicken breasts. One breast for dinner, the others to be frozen for meals later in the fall or winter.

I had muffins planned for the zucchini I had bought in the morning so I got those mixed and into the oven. While they baked I folded and sorted the laundry.

The potatoes for our dinner were done and cooling. The chicken was done. So Curt worked on a batch of cherry tomatoes (blanched and skinned) to put in the smoker. These get frozen in small batches and are great additions to soup, stew or sauce.

Smoked tomatoes

The tomatoes and chicken got packed and put into the freezer. We had a great dinner of potato/smoked chicken salad and finished out the day cleaning up the kitchen which looked pretty trashed after all the cooking and smoking and baking. Time to collapse into those comfy front room chairs.

What’s on for today? I think some reading, napping, a little football (Go Pack!). Afterall, Sunday is the day of rest. Ha! Oh wait, I was going to do something with those apples.

Another Turn of the Page: Back to the Beginning

“Harry — I think I’ve just understood something! I’ve got to go to the library!”
And she sprinted away, up the stairs.
What does she understand?” said Harry distractedly, still looking around, trying to tell where the voice had come from.
“Loads more than I do,” said Ron, shaking his head.
“But why’s she got to go to the library?”
“Because that’s what Hermione does,” said Ron, shrugging.
“When in doubt, go to the library.”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

Over the last year we have been talking about moving our wonderful round table book group from the coffee shop where we meet every second Thursday to someplace that is quieter. Since its humble beginnings back in, hmm, I think 2004, when I was still a librarian, a fledgling group met to present the books they were reading in this unique place. Surrounded by books and coffee, tea and pastry, it was perfect. I blogged here about this beginning and its first transition in 2011. But then it grew and so did we. As The Attic grew, more and more people competed for tabes and more coffee was sold and thus the sound of the espresso machine grinding coffee was a constant reminder that we weren’t in our own private room. Our little group also grew. Where we once had 4 – 6 people on a good day, we now had 12 -14. We would crowd around the tables, (sometimes three tables pushed together) and try to hear our fellow book lovers discuss their latest read. Not everyone has a loud, projecting teacher voice and frankly some of us are not hearing as well as we did 10 years ago, so many were missing out on complete presentations. So we talked about other locations. Most eateries or coffee shops aren’t interested in a big noisy group who camp out for 2 hours, they want to turn tables. That is why The Attic and its owner, Bill Macier was special. I finally thought, why not go back to the library? The only reason we started here was because it began as an outreach program but I retired in 2010!  We tried it last month. The room we chose was cold but the sound was great. We agreed to give it another go. So our September meeting is in a different room which we hope will be warmer. It does have softer chairs. Our biggest regret is the lack of coffee but I told our group, stop in The Attic and grab a cup before heading over to the meeting. It’s the least we can do for our host for all these years.

1. Mother Land by Paul Theroux (2017) 509p. A novel of a family held together and torn apart by its narcissistic matriarch who excels at playing her offspring against each other. Our reviewer liked the writing but found it overly long and repetitive.

2. Color of Lightning by Paulette Jiles (2009) 349p. “Eloquent, illuminating tale about frontier life in Northern Texas between 1864-1871. Based on a true story, this novel is also graphic and bloody in its descriptions of the capture and dispatching of frontiers’ people  by Kiowa and Comanche.” -Goodreads

3. Cutthroat by Clive Cussler (2017) 393p. Isaac Bell series #10. The year is 1911. Chief Investigator Isaac Bell of the Van Dorn Detective Agency has been hired to find a young woman named Anna Pape who ran away from home to become an actress, Bell gets a shock when her murdered body turns up instead.

4. End of Watch by Stephen King (2016) 432p. Bill Hodges series #3. This is the 3rd book in the series. Our reviewer read it not realizing this fact. Our recommendation: Excellent series but start with Mr. Mercedes, followed by Finders Keepers.

5. Not a Sound by Heather Gudenkauf (2017) 320p. A contemporary thriller featuring a deaf protagonist. It will keep you turning the pages from the shocking opening to the twisty turning ending. It was a good summer read (or anytime of the year.)

6. Wanted Man by Lee Child (2012) 405p. Jack Reacher #17. Jack Reacher novels. They’re formulaic, completely predictable, and the action scenes are fun, in a big body count kind of way. Usually they are stand-alones but this one isn’t going to make too much sense unless you read the previous book, Worth Dying For. Odds are, if you are a Reacher fan you’ve read it, and even though this is a weak entry in the series, you won’t care.

7. Caesar by Colleen McCullough (1997) 752p. Masters of Rome #5. Excellent historical fiction. McCullough does her homework and her writing breathes life into Julius Caesar as he transforms from a master politician to a brutal military genius. This whole series has received excellent reviews and can be read out of order.

8. The Nest by Cynthis D’Aprix Sweeney ( 2016) 368p. The title of the book refers to a “nest egg” as we follow four adult siblings and the fate of the shared inheritance that has shaped their lives.

9. A Warrior of the People: How Susan La Flesche Overcame Racial and Gender Inequality to Become America’s First Indian Doctor by Joe Starita (2016) 320p. On March 14, 1889, Susan La Flesche received her medical degree—becoming the first Native American doctor in U.S. history. This is her story.

10. Then Came You by Jennifer Weiner (2010) 352p.Considered a light beach read, Weiner’s latest story is about four women whose lives become entwined by circumstance (one baby). The story unfolds as each chapter is devoted to the point of view of an individual character.

11. Second Sister by Marie Bostwick (2015) 352p. A powerful story of two sisters, one who is loving, caring, and a bit odd, the other, a workaholic who lives life in the fast lane and just wants to forget the past and focus on the future. An unexpected tragedy occurs with Alice (the eldest) that forces her younger sister (Lucy) to come back to her roots.

 

Well those are the last books of August. Will we say farewell to this special place or go back in October? I will report back after our next meeting.

The Attic: Books & Coffee, 730 Bodart St., Green Bay, Wisconsin

A Poem for your Thoughts

Lately I have had so many ideas and experienced so many events that would make great posts I really was unsure where to start. But then today as we were hanging and rehanging some of the art in our home I saw and reread the poem we got at this year’s Artstreet, the annual art fair in Green Bay, Wisconsin.

Artstreet is a three-day festival of about 200 artists booths, multiple music stages and lots of food vendors. The visual artists include painters, sculptors, printmakers, jewelers, weavers, potters or they make things like wooden bowls, clothing, baskets and furniture. At least I thought they were all visual artists until this year when we rounded one corner and saw this:

photo courtesy of Terra Fewless

(This picture I got from a friend because I didn’t have my wits about me at the time to take a picture.) Seated at the table, was a man, the poet, in a shirt and tie, and wearing a brown fedora on his head. In front of him was a little grey manual Smith Corona typewriter. On the sandwich blackboard it said:

POEMS
•Any Topic
•Typed while you wait
•Pay whatever you choose

Curt immediately say down and said he would like a poem about birds. The poet proceeded to ask him some questions like interests, what he bought at Artstreet, and other things to get a feel for the poem he was about to write on the spot. Curt told him we were birders and we had purchased a carved feather from one of the artists but he didn’t show the poet the piece we bought. As they continued to talk I wandered off because once the poet had the information he needed he had to spend a little time thinking and typing. I was back in about 10 minutes and the poet had a piece of paper in the typewriter and was slowing working away, considering his words and his punctuation. No whiteout here so mistakes really weren’t acceptable (on ours he did change “moves” to “move” so we have a tiny cross out). When he was done, he embossed it with a seal that said: Fox River Poetry Company, est. 2012, Berlin, WI. He numbered it (#617), signed it, dated it and then he read it to us.

Flight

Look closely and you can see
the air moves. See the dip and
curl of feathers while they
press the air and put to rest
every rule of gravity and how
we live in it.  They are the ones
that look down–
from tops of trees, from the
windswept thermals, from
perches that we can only
dream of.  They speak a
language of morning.
It is their song that defines
their place in the world,
that small self-claimed spot,
but they all lay claim to the air,
that lofty space above us,
where we can only fly in
when we dream.

Flight by Paul Wiegel (2017)

 

We were quite pleased,(although Curt expected something more haiku-ish), not just with the poem but with the experience. So today we hung the poem just below the carved feather. I think it works.

Northern Cardinal: Tail Feather #5 by Ginnie Sherer and Dick Oelschlager (top) and Flight by Paul Wiegel (bottom)

If you are interested in a poem of your own you can contact Paul Wiegel at his website, Fox River Poetry or look for him at an art fair or market near you.

Eclipse Fever

We had this little event on Monday called The Great American Eclipse. When I first heard about it I wasn’t too excited because the path it was taking was either way West or South of where I live in the upper Midwest. But my son visited about a month ago and said, “Well you’ll get about 78% coverage.” That seemed more significant than I originally thought so I marked it on the calendar, noting the time of maximum coverage and waited for the day.

When August 21 arrived I still hadn’t decided how I going to do to view this celestial phenomenon. But as I started watching the coverage on TV and saw the first excited crowds in Idaho, I thought I should do some preparation, quickly. I hadn’t bought any glasses but I vaguely remembered something about making a viewer from a cereal box. I did recall as a kid there was an eclipse and we just poked a pin in a piece of paper but that seemed pretty minimal. So about a half an hour before the event would begin here I found a narrow box just a bit wider than a cereal box. Note: All my cereal boxes were full of cereal. I quickly googled instructions and slapped together a viewer. It worked.

Me w/ viewer (left) and what I could see (right)

Meanwhile Curt had come home and said he had read that using a colander or a strainer or something with holes would do the trick. We gathered our holey devices.

Ultimately the large colander worked the best. OooH! Aaaah!

One colander. Many eclipses!

We then remembered someone saying that during an eclipse the dappled light coming through the leaves of trees would turn into crescents. Sure enough! The left side of these pictures of the side of our house and our deck are the normal views, the right side is during the eclipse.

Can you see the crescents?

So without much advance preparation we had one good time last Monday even if we couldn’t experience the awe of a total eclipse. Though after what I saw on TV it might be worth driving to a nearby location for the next one full one, only seven years away.

This Great American Eclipse report brought to you by:

Mrs. and Mr. Science

When in Door County, WI, act like a Bier Zot

A what?

from B.C., Johnny Hart

No, not that Zot.

Translated from the Flemish: Bier = Beer   Zot = Idiot or Crazy :  To be a Beer Idiot or someone Crazy for Beer who goes to the Bier Zot Beer Cafe in Sister Bay, Door County, Wisconsin.

Bier Zot front door ( that space in the right side of picture is Wild Tomato 2 Restaurant) , Menu pic

We discovered this fun place last Friday but it has been there since 2014. We’re a bit slow sometimes. The Bier Zot is a Belgian style Beer Cafe that serves 11 drafts, one cask and 100 bottles of craft and Belgian beers. Couple this with a “European inspired” menu and you’ve got a tasty combination. The restaurant has casual pub style decor with outdoor seating as well.

Now the only way we found this place was through another restaurant, Wild Tomato, owned by the same people, Britt & Sara Unkefer. That restaurant in Fish Creek (further down on the peninsula) serves really great wood fired pizza. We did a short post on it in 2010. Last year the owners decided to open Wild Tomato 2 alongside their Bier Zot so while stopping for pizza at the new location we discovered it (the entrances share a hallway.) On this latest trip our destination was definitely Bier Zot, no pizza distraction.

Once seated the Beer Board offered an interesting selection. The waitress helped us navigate through it. There were full descriptions of the beers in the menu as well.

Curt went with the Ommegang Rosetta, a sour beer that I find hard to take by itself but it goes very well with food. I wanted something in the pale ale range and she suggested Boulevard Tropical Pale (half pour please). On both of these we were allowed a sample before committing to a glass. Our friend Carol was with us and she went with the Ommegang as well.

Ommegang Rosetta and Boulevard Tropical Pale

Next up, food. Now Bier Zot describes itself as a European inspired cafe and for the most part that is true. I saw a lot of German influence ( Thursday night was actually German Night) but there was French influence and some just creative cuisine as well. Find their menu here.

I went with the Chicken Schnitzel Sandwich. Schnitzel is just a pounded, seasoned and breaded meat that is fried. I am sure you are familiar with Wiener Schnitzel which is a breaded veal cutlet. My Chicken Schnitzel was served on a pretzel bun with greens, a yellow heirloom tomato and Dijon horseradish sauce. I liked it.Carol chose the Bier Zot Bratwurst. This was their house recipe brat on pretzel bun accompanied by sauerkraut and Dijon mustard. We can only assume they make these on the premises because it was extra long and it fit the bun, sort of. It had a taste and found it milder than many Wisconsin brats, more like a veal sausage.  I am ordering that next time. Finally Curt started out with a half-dozen Washington State oysters, which seems to be a new addition to the menu, pending availability. He followed that with the Aubergine Zacusca. This was grilled eggplant with tomato, greens, shallots, basil chevré and ground cumin on Naan. Our server told us this was concocted by a former staff member who is Muslim and had a hard time finding anything Halal in the kitchen.  It was a success and  found a permanent home on the menu.  It was excellent.

You can tell we passed our dishes around so everyone could get a taste. Hmm, maybe I’ll have this one next time.All in all it was a very enjoyable lunch and we will return.

One more thing. It took us a minute to figure out what the wooden tables were constructed from…..can you see it? Bleachers. Sturdy and a good reuse. In case you don’t feel like an idiot, Zot can also be translated from Albanian as “god”.  Beer idiot?  Beer god?  Maybe there’s not much difference between the two.

Another Turn of the Page: June Reads

“I’ve always loved joining clubs–although,
in truth, they’re usually book clubs.”
Gitty Daneshveri

reading program

I really hate to do two book posts back to back but I’ve been having a writing dry spell.  All my creative juices have been going into bookmaking, gardening, embroidery and travel. So you are stuck with another reading post. Now that shouldn’t be too bad. Summer reading programs at libraries across the country are in full swing so I am betting that some of you are looking for a great read to get to that next prize level. Or not. After I retired from the library I joined the reading club every year. When I was a Librarian I wasn’t allowed to participate because it wouldn’t look right, I guess, for the worker bees to win prizes. For adults this usually amounted to free coffee certificates at a local cafe or a cool bookmark, not exactly trips or flat screen TVs. But I understand. So after I retired I participated for about 5 years. Never won anything and frankly I didn’t need an incentive to read, so last year I didn’t join. Now I am not saying you shouldn’t sign up. If you have kids or grandkids it is a great way to read along with them. Or maybe you do need that extra push to open up more than one book in the summer. Reading Programs are right for you.

So, looking for a book to take on vacation? Will one more book get you to the Star Reader level? Try one of these:

july17

  1. Spirit of Steamboat by Craig Johnson (2013) 146p A short sweet novella featuring Walt Longmire. Very much like the Christmas books many other authors release once a year, so don’t expect an involved plot. However if you enjoy the Longmire series this is an added treat.
  2. My Salinger Year by Joanna Rakoff (2014) 252p A memoir about literary New York in the late nineties where a young woman finds herself entangled with one of the last great figures of the century, J.D. Salinger.

  3. A Piece of the World by Christina Baker Kline (2017) 320p  Andrew Wyeth’s painting, Christina’s World, is based on a real woman named Christina, who is restricted by a crippling disease she was born with that only worsens as she gets older. This novel examines both her life on a farming ranch in Maine and the painting.

  4. Beartown by Fredrik Backman (2017) 432p Beartown is a small town in Sweden that is slowly but surely fading away. It is a hockey town (think ‘Friday Night Lights’ in Texas) and too many of the residents financial futures are tied to this sport.  Hockey is the business of Beartown. Winning is everything.
    But when a tragic event occurs the people of this small community are unsure where to place their faith anymore.  It is an inner look at how people, families, and teams in communities respond in the face of adversity. You don’t even have to like hockey to love this book.

  5. News of the World by Paulette Jiles (2016) 209p  In the aftermath of the American Civil War, an aging itinerant news reader agrees to transport a young captive of the Kiowa back to her people.

  6. A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles (2016) 462p  In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov, an aristocrat who has written seditious poetry, is sentenced to house arrest at the Metropol Hotel in Moscow. He is removed from his suite of rooms there to a dusty attic room. His life might appear to be over, but you will be surprised at the life he eventually lives.
    .
  7. The Drifter by Nicholas Petrie (2016) 384p  Peter Ash returns from two stints in Iraq with a severe case of claustrophobia. Once you learn how this affects his daily life you get tossed into a mystery thriller full of former military tough guys, a surprising discovery under an old rotted porch, and a mean, smelly 150 pound dog named Charles Mingus. First in a projected series featuring Peter Ash.

  8. Spy Sinker by Len Deighton (1992) 400p  The final volume of the second trilogy featuring British agent Bernard Samson. If you like British spy thrillers, at the very least, read Spy Hook and Spy Line before even thinking about this one.

  9. A Beautiful Mind by Sylvia Nasar (2002) 464p  The book is about the life story of John Forbes Nash – a mathematical genius and inventor of a theory of rational behaviour for which he was awarded a Nobel Prize in 1994.

  10. Don’t Go by Lisa Scottoline (2013) 374p  While Mike Scalon is serving in Afghanistan, his wife dies in an apparant household accident, leaving his baby daughter motherless. He has only 10 days back home to take care of business so he places his daughter temporarily with his brother and sister-in-law.  After he returns from overseas, he begins to find out that things are what they seem.

  11. And Then Life Happens: A Memoir by Auma Obama (2012) 342p   A moving account by Auma Obama about of her life in Africa and Europe, and her relationship with her brother, Barack Obama.

  12. A Wolf called Romeo by Nick Jans (2014) 288p The unlikely true story of a six-year friendship between a wild, oddly gentle black wolf and the people and dogs of Juneau, Alaska.

     
  13. The Selected Letters of Laura Ingalls Wilder by William Anderson (2016) 432p This book contains several hundred of the letters written by Laura Ingalls Wilder that have been maintained in public and private collections.

 

Another Turn of the Page: The Summer Reading List

Remember when you looked forward to summer because you were out of school, you were free to sleep late, do nothing and read whatever you wanted to read. That was me. I loved to read and still do. However now I don’t have to look forward to summer to read whatever and whenever I want.

Just for fun I asked my book group members to each compose the list of books they were hoping to read this summer. I had no restrictions. It could be anything. Maybe it was the next new book coming out in the next three months by an author they love. It could be one book or 20.

Well, I wasn’t sure I’d get anything but many indulged me and put together a list. Some said they really didn’t have any plans. Once they finished the current book they would start looking for the next. Others remarked that when they were in high school summer meant required reading lists for the fall semester and that was no fun. They didn’t want to revive bad memories.  So if you are looking for the next book in your reading life, or you are just curious,for better or worse, here is our:

SUMMER READING LIST. Sorry, no annotations but you have Amazon. Look them up. Also if you want to see the list larger just click on it.

 

Wow! It Suddenly got Quite Fragrant Here

I’ve been upstairs in the office working on various projects.

Catching up on emails, monitoring the weather, drafting a blog post (not this one) and working on a woodblock design, when what to my wondering nose should appear the smell of onions closely followed by curry and other smells I couldn’t identify.

My husband is downstairs experimenting in the kitchen.

I immediately had to investigate the source of all this olfactory stimulus. It was Vadouvan, a spice blend recipe. So what I was smelling was a combination of onions, shallots, garlic, fenugreek, curry, cumin, cardamom, brown mustard seed, turmeric, nutmeg, cloves, red pepper flakes and vegetable oil. By the time I arrived it had all been ground and combined and placed on parchment paper and was now in the oven browning.

Curt had seen one of the home cooks on the Masterchef television show use it and Mr. Curiosity had to know more. Basically it is, or will be, a ready-to-use blend of spices that is a French derivative of a masala. A masala is a South Asian spice mix. If it is a success we will be enjoying it on our chicken thighs tonight with a side of cilantro/vinegar/oil dressed potatoes.

For now, with the house closed up because of the heat and the impending storms, I feel like I am living in a spice market somewhere between France and South Vietnam.