Honor the Source; Venison and Potato Salad

Venison Potato SaladThe second left-over meal descending from Kenn’s gift of a venison loin (Honor the Source was the original and Thai Venison Salad the first left-over) is adapted from the Silver Palette cookbook. The original was made with beef tenderloin or rib-eye and an aggressively garlicky dressing.  Although I haven’t tried it with anything other than beef, I think this simple, hearty salad would work with almost any left-over, lean, grilled meat or poultry.

Ingredients, minus the peppers, mustard, vinegar and olive oil I forgot to put in the set up

Venison Potato Salad with garlicky vinaigrette dressing

6 oz (more or less to taste) grilled venison
4 medium potatoes, cooked and sliced
1/2 medium onion, thinly sliced
1/2 cup red, yellow or green bell pepper, cut into bite-sized pieces
2-3 cloves garlic, mashed
1 tsp. dry mustard (or 1 tsp. Dijon style mustard) – optional
1 Tbs. sherry vinegar (or substitute malt vinegar)
1 Tbs. Worcestershire sauce (I use Col. Pabst All Malt Amber-Lager Worcestershire)
2 Tbs. top quality Extra-virgin Olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

In a large mixing bowl, combine the meat, potatoes, peppers and onion.  Toss gently to mix.

Gently mix meat, potatoes and onions

In a small bowl, mix the vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, olive oil, garlic, mustard (if using), salt and pepper.  Dress the meat and potatoes and toss gently to coat

Dress the salad and gently mix

A hearty simple salad for two.

Venison Potato Salad with garlicky vinaigrette dressing

 

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Another Turn of the Page: Short but Sweet

“When I got [my] library card, that was when my life began.”
Rita Mae Brown

Raise your hand…Who remembers the card catalog?

I sure do. I used it when I was a kid, a young adult and as an adult. I filed cards in it and looked through it to help my customers find a book when I first was a librarian. And I mourned its loss when we went digital. Don’t get me wrong, a computerized card catalog was so much easier to maintain and much more efficient than the old card catalog but it was just bittersweet. The loss of those warm brown drawers with all the handwritten, typed or printed cards was sad. If your library was old enough your card catalog had all three. Sometimes the cards had little handwritten notes like “third floor storage” or “rare books room.” That is mostly what I miss, that hint of an actual librarian making sure you could find this book. So there’s your little trip down memory lane.
Anyway we were a small group in March, just seven. Two other members sent me their book reviews from points south, so we ended up with nine titles to recommend.

1. The Keeper of Bees by Gene Stratton-Porter (1925) 528 pages. A classic by an author usually overlooked. Stratton-Porter was an amateur naturalist, a wildlife photographer and a writer of novels. In this book, her last, a Master Bee Keeper and his bees restore a severely wounded World War I veteran, Jamie McFarlane, back to health.

2. The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah (2018) 435 pages. Ernt Allbright, a former POW, comes home from the Vietnam war a changed and volatile man. When he loses yet another job, he makes an impulsive decision: he will move his family north, to Alaska, where they will live off the grid in America’s last true frontier. His PTSD, an undiagnosed condition in 1974, takes a toll on him and his family.

3. Nine Dragons by Michael Connelly (2009) 374 pages. (Harry Bosch series #14) Harry Bosch is assigned a homicide call in South L.A. that takes him to Fortune Liquors, where the Chinese owner has been shot to death behind the counter in an apparent robbery. All signs point to the Hong Kong Triad. When Harry’s daughter disappears in Hong Kong, Harry must find out if the two incidents are connected.

4. The Enemy by Lee Child (2004) 464 pages (Jack Reacher series #8) Long before the events of the previous seven novels Reacher got involved in something while he was an MP Major and had to take a demotion as a ‘punishment’. This is the story of that one messy, tangled case that can shatter a career and put a man on a different path.

5. Last Time They Met by Anita Shreve (2001) 325 pages. This tells the story of intense love between Linda and Thomas who first meet as high school teenagers then as young adults and much later as adults just past their prime when both have established themselves in similar careers. A story of first loves and second chances.

6. Icy Sparks by Gwyn Hyman Rubio (1998) 320 pages. A tale of a young girl with Tourette’s Syndrome, growing up in the mountains of Eastern Kentucky during the 1950’s.

7. The Jane Austen Project by Kathleen Flynn (2017) 384 pages. Dr. Rachel Katzman and her colleague, actor Liam Finucane, are sent back in time to find an unpublished Austen novel and, hopefully, to diagnose the illness that led to Austen’s premature death. They must not affect any history in any way that will change the future. ( Good luck with that). A nice mix of Connie Willis’ The Doomsday Book ( time traveling historians) and The Sound of Thunder by Ray Bradbury ( a short story tackling The Butterfly Effect).

8. Prince of Risk by Christopher Reich (2013) 369 pages. Bobby Astor is a fearless New York hedge-fund gunslinger on the verge of making his biggest killing ever. But everything changes when his father, the venerable chief executive of the New York Stock Exchange, is murdered along with the head of the Federal Reserve in a brazen, inexplicable attack on the South Lawn of the White House. Goodreads summary.

9. Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult (2016) 480 pages. Picoult likes to tackle hot-button issues and this book certainly fits the bill. About a year ago, the author read where a black female nurse in Flint, Michigan had been dismissed by a white supremacist patient over skin color. Picoult used that court case as the basis for this book.

Another Turn of the Page: June Reads

“I’ve always loved joining clubs–although,
in truth, they’re usually book clubs.”
Gitty Daneshveri

reading program

I really hate to do two book posts back to back but I’ve been having a writing dry spell.  All my creative juices have been going into bookmaking, gardening, embroidery and travel. So you are stuck with another reading post. Now that shouldn’t be too bad. Summer reading programs at libraries across the country are in full swing so I am betting that some of you are looking for a great read to get to that next prize level. Or not. After I retired from the library I joined the reading club every year. When I was a Librarian I wasn’t allowed to participate because it wouldn’t look right, I guess, for the worker bees to win prizes. For adults this usually amounted to free coffee certificates at a local cafe or a cool bookmark, not exactly trips or flat screen TVs. But I understand. So after I retired I participated for about 5 years. Never won anything and frankly I didn’t need an incentive to read, so last year I didn’t join. Now I am not saying you shouldn’t sign up. If you have kids or grandkids it is a great way to read along with them. Or maybe you do need that extra push to open up more than one book in the summer. Reading Programs are right for you.

So, looking for a book to take on vacation? Will one more book get you to the Star Reader level? Try one of these:

july17

  1. Spirit of Steamboat by Craig Johnson (2013) 146p A short sweet novella featuring Walt Longmire. Very much like the Christmas books many other authors release once a year, so don’t expect an involved plot. However if you enjoy the Longmire series this is an added treat.
  2. My Salinger Year by Joanna Rakoff (2014) 252p A memoir about literary New York in the late nineties where a young woman finds herself entangled with one of the last great figures of the century, J.D. Salinger.

  3. A Piece of the World by Christina Baker Kline (2017) 320p  Andrew Wyeth’s painting, Christina’s World, is based on a real woman named Christina, who is restricted by a crippling disease she was born with that only worsens as she gets older. This novel examines both her life on a farming ranch in Maine and the painting.

  4. Beartown by Fredrik Backman (2017) 432p Beartown is a small town in Sweden that is slowly but surely fading away. It is a hockey town (think ‘Friday Night Lights’ in Texas) and too many of the residents financial futures are tied to this sport.  Hockey is the business of Beartown. Winning is everything.
    But when a tragic event occurs the people of this small community are unsure where to place their faith anymore.  It is an inner look at how people, families, and teams in communities respond in the face of adversity. You don’t even have to like hockey to love this book.

  5. News of the World by Paulette Jiles (2016) 209p  In the aftermath of the American Civil War, an aging itinerant news reader agrees to transport a young captive of the Kiowa back to her people.

  6. A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles (2016) 462p  In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov, an aristocrat who has written seditious poetry, is sentenced to house arrest at the Metropol Hotel in Moscow. He is removed from his suite of rooms there to a dusty attic room. His life might appear to be over, but you will be surprised at the life he eventually lives.
    .
  7. The Drifter by Nicholas Petrie (2016) 384p  Peter Ash returns from two stints in Iraq with a severe case of claustrophobia. Once you learn how this affects his daily life you get tossed into a mystery thriller full of former military tough guys, a surprising discovery under an old rotted porch, and a mean, smelly 150 pound dog named Charles Mingus. First in a projected series featuring Peter Ash.

  8. Spy Sinker by Len Deighton (1992) 400p  The final volume of the second trilogy featuring British agent Bernard Samson. If you like British spy thrillers, at the very least, read Spy Hook and Spy Line before even thinking about this one.

  9. A Beautiful Mind by Sylvia Nasar (2002) 464p  The book is about the life story of John Forbes Nash – a mathematical genius and inventor of a theory of rational behaviour for which he was awarded a Nobel Prize in 1994.

  10. Don’t Go by Lisa Scottoline (2013) 374p  While Mike Scalon is serving in Afghanistan, his wife dies in an apparant household accident, leaving his baby daughter motherless. He has only 10 days back home to take care of business so he places his daughter temporarily with his brother and sister-in-law.  After he returns from overseas, he begins to find out that things are what they seem.

  11. And Then Life Happens: A Memoir by Auma Obama (2012) 342p   A moving account by Auma Obama about of her life in Africa and Europe, and her relationship with her brother, Barack Obama.

  12. A Wolf called Romeo by Nick Jans (2014) 288p The unlikely true story of a six-year friendship between a wild, oddly gentle black wolf and the people and dogs of Juneau, Alaska.

     
  13. The Selected Letters of Laura Ingalls Wilder by William Anderson (2016) 432p This book contains several hundred of the letters written by Laura Ingalls Wilder that have been maintained in public and private collections.

 

Where Does the Time Go?

End of May we got together with an old friend. He lives in Maryland but was going to be in Wisconsin for a funeral. I estimate it has been over 30 years since we have all seen each other face to face.

We met Jon, and at that time, his wife Molly, when we were in graduate school at Northern Illinois University. Curt was a Graduate student in Ceramics and Jon was one of his ceramics professors. The unusual part was Jon and Curt were the same age, separated by 25 days, Curt being the older. A friendship and a mutual respect developed between the two of them. I got to know Molly better and the four of us became friends. Once we graduated, we left Illinois. There was no email then, no Facebook so  but kept in contact with each other through letters and Christmas cards. Jon and Molly visited us once in Green Bay and we visited them once in Maryland.

Then: Curt and Jon

But over the years the cards and letters got fewer, life happened, as it does, and we lost track of each other. A few years ago I found Jon (or he found me) on Facebook. Our mutual interest in birds, love of food and Jon’s connection to Wisconsin (he was born here) brought us together. He was going to be in LaCrosse in May and then planned on doing some camping in Door County, so we knew this was the time to rekindle an old friendship. In the intervening years there has been homes in 5 states, 3 children raised (He-2, Us-1), careers built, a divorce, less hair, gray acquired and a couple of retirements. But here we were again eating and talking and laughing.

Now: Curt and Jon

Funny thing with good friends, the conversation picked up like we just saw each other yesterday. And with that many years gone by we had a lot of catching up to do.

Pharma-Scrabble

I’m sure you’ve noticed the proliferation of advertising for prescription drugs on the TV in recent years. Gone are the days when the name of a drug might give you some understanding of what it does. The names are often a meaningless and atypical grouping of letters (with frequent use of “bohemian” letters like J, V, X, Y & Z) that are intended to make the drug name stand out but instead makes them all start sounding the same.

Over the past several weeks I’ve been keeping track of the drugs (mostly prescription but a few over-the-counter) advertised on broadcast TV during prime time. I’ve come up with 31 different drugs although I’m sure I’ve missed some.

In looking over the names it occurred to me that many of them would be great Scrabble or Words-with-Friends words (if proper names were allowed) so I tallied the scores each would bring, not counting any double/triple letter/word bonuses.  Any thing above 15 is a respectable score but some drug companies are just not trying very hard to win the game and use too many low scoring vowels and consonants in too short names.  A few load the deck, using hardly any vowels and extra “bohemian” consonants.

Of course, their scoring potential aside, I doubt you could tell me what more than a handful of these drugs are for.

The addition of the X saves the day with a score of 19

Score = 8    Too short, too many low scoring vowels

Score = 13

Score = 20

Score = 17

Score = 16

Score = 18

Score = 11

Score = 13

Score = 15

Score = 18

Score = 16

Score = 15

Score = 16

Score = 11

Score = 17

Score = 21

Score = 15

Score = 12

Score = 12

Score = 12

Score = 14

Score = 14

Score = 14

Score = 10

Score = 21

Score = 14

The winner at 39 points. Too bad there aren’t two Xs in Scrabble

Score = 24  Good job of packing the high scoring letters into a short name

Score = 17

Score = 20

Another Turn of the Page: The Need to Escape

“I was burning through books every day – stories about people and places I’d never heard of. They were perhaps the only thing that kept me from teetering into utter despair.”
Sarah J. Maas, A Court of Mist and Fury

full-shelfYes, our country right now is in such a state of turmoil and uncertainty that only escape into a book can keep the demons at bay. As the quote so apply says, keeps us “from teetering into despair.” Is it as bad as all that? Well sometimes. We have a narcissistic egomaniac in the White House and if it wasn’t for our humorists (who are gifted with tons of material every day) and our books, we might all just explode. Immersing oneself into an adventure, a mystery, a romance, another life, another world can be so fun and so comforting. Here’s what we escaped into in January.

jan1. Before the Fall by Noah Hawley (2016) 391 pages. A plane crash, eleven on board, only two survive, Scott, a painter, and a young boy, J.J. who Scott manages to save by swimming to shore with the boy on his back. Other occupants, like J.J.’s father, were controversial and powerful figures. Could they have been targeted? Is Scott a hero or villain?

2. Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty (2014) 460 pages. Something awful happens at the annual Pirriwee Public School fund-raising. You know the What but not the Who or the How. Along the way you discover some of the dangerous little lies that people tell just to be able to face the day.

3. As You Wish : Inconceivable Tales from the Making of The Princess Bride by Cary Elwes (2014) 259 pages. If you have seen the movie The Princess Bride you will love this book. And then you will want to watch it all over again.

4. Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier (1997) 449 pages. The story of a soldier gone AWOL from the Civil War and his perilous journey home through the devastation the war has left in its wake. But also the story of Ada, who he is trying to return to, and her struggle to survive on her farm alone after her father dies.

5. The Gulity by David Baldacci (2015) 672 pages. Will Robie series #4. This book continues the life of Robie, a government assassin who now finds himself at a crossroad in his life. His last assignment, where he killed an innocent bystander has resulted in him questioning his capabilities.

6. Rules for Old Men Waiting by Peter Pouncey (2005) 240 pages. A book about an old guy examining his life, a book about a young man who thinks about the world, a book about a marriage relationship, a book about facing oneself, a book about discovering the effect one has had on others. Also WWI, WWII and even some rugby.

7. Pecan Man by Cassie Dandridge Selleck (2012) 146 pages. When the white police chief’s son, who we know has raped a young black girl, is found stabbed to death in the woods, the first person accused is Eldred Mims, known as the Pee-can Man. Eldred is a homeless black man who mows lawns and does yard work for a living. Though innocent, Mims is sentenced to prison.

8. All the Stars in Heaven by Adriana Trigiani (2015) 447 pages. This novel is a fictional account of the relationship between actors Loretta Young and Clark Gable on the set of The Call of the Wild in 1935.

Just Who Was Wearing Those Hats?

hatsSaturday, January 21, 2017 was the Women’s March, a significant and historic event. I was not available to march but lent my support by knitting 13 pink hats known as Pussyhats. Three of my hats went to the Washington March with a High School friend and two of her companions. They reported that the experience was amazing and on their way home they continued to proudly wear their hats. At rest stops and gas fill-up people asked to take their pictures. The hats also served as very positive conversation starters. By the way, the latest numbers I saw on the Washington Women’s March was a half million.

My Washington Marchers from Illinois

My Washington Marchers from Illinois

Two of my hats went to Madison, WI with two very close friends. They marched with 75,00 to 100,00 other participants. At one point near the end of the march a young woman asked my friend Marjorie where she got her hat and how could she get one. Marjorie immediately removed her hat and gave it to her. Then Patricia gave her hat to the young woman’s companion. It was that kind of day.

My Madison Women in front of the the statue 'Forward" A Wisconsin Women's Memorial from the Columbian Exposition 1893. Sculptor: Jean P. Miner

My Madison Women in front of the statue ‘Forward” A Wisconsin Women’s Memorial from the Colombian Exposition 1893. Sculptor: Jean P. Miner

Proud owners of new Pussyhats courtesy of two amazing women.

Proud owners of new Pussyhats courtesy of two amazing women.

As you can see from the last picture not all people who marched on Saturday were women. There were many men there in support of women and women’s rights. And a lot of them were wearing hats, yes Pussyhats, with courtesy and permission from their ladies. They didn’t just take them. Here is an album of Wisconsin men at the march from the blog Each Little World. All photos copyright of photographer Mark Golbach.

The remainder of the hats I knitted went to Washington to be distributed to whoever needed one. But now what? The march may be over but there is still alot of work to be done. Here’s my pitch if you want to be part of the movement. The Women’s March project has initiated 10 Actions in the first 100 days. Follow this link to get involved. First action, postcards to your senators. Go ahead, do it, do it now.

The Morning After

mourning-buntingI went to bed last night depressed. It was only 10:30pm and as I watched my state of Wisconsin go down like the Titanic I knew what the outcome of the presidential election was going to be. So I tossed and turned and once in a while my heart said, “maybe, you’re wrong.”  But my brain knew the absolute truth. The bigots, the racists, the misogynists, the haters, the fools, the naive, the idiots, had won the night.

So I woke up in a very sad mood. I checked my iPad quickly to see the result and it seemed worse than I imagined. As I made my way down to the breakfast table I decided I could not bear to watch acceptance speeches and endless analysis. I already was at my wit’s end after almost 2 years of political ads and primaries and anonymous phone calls and debates. So most of my morning was spent on a very low key. A cup of yogurt, a few pieces in the jigsaw puzzle. Once I took a shower and got dressed I did what I usually do when I am anxious or depressed, I clean. I tidy up. Kitchen floor, check! Bathroom, check. Vacuuming, check!

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“Buck up, kiddo, tomorrow’s going to be another day.” – a little known Master Yoda quote

As I worked my mood started to change to fear. Fear of those who think this victory will give them freedom to bully, discriminate, assault and abuse anyone they don’t agree with or don’t like the color of. Because that was what some of this election was about. It wasn’t only those who were getting a raw deal on their health care or haven’t had a decent job in years who voted. I can accept those complaints. But those who think hate is now the acceptable status quo are the ones I fear. That voting for The Donald now gives them that right. However, the wise Jedi Master Yoda once said, “Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering.” No, I didn’t want to go there. That just makes me like them.

I am sure my social conscience will rise up again and I will get involved in some way. But I am weary. I became an Independent Deputy in January and have been registering people to vote at libraries, high schools and local colleges in my area. I have been answering questions about voting, I have been encouraging people to vote, I’ve been putting signs in my yard….I am tired of it all. So, for now I am going underground, to decompress. I need to read and knit and work on my art. I need to concentrate on my physical therapy and get this new knee running like …a knee. It is going to take a bit to shake off the yuk that I feel from this election and Donald Trump. I also plan on avoiding as much of the inaugural hoopla as possible. Watching him and his family party just seems wrong. Getting away would be nice and Canada always seemed a possibility but I think it is closed right now. So I will be staying put, and damn! after four years of this new administration I’ll have the cleanest house around.

BFFs

Last week I spent three fabulous days with two dear, dear friends from high school  (graduation: June 1967). We have been getting together on and off over the years either going out to Colorado to where Lynn lives or up here in Wisconsin with me or to Arlington Heights in Illinois, Audrey’s stomping ground. Last year we got together in Santa Fe, New Mexico and vowed that we would not let years go by before getting together.

Reason 1) We ain’t getting any younger.

Reason 2) We heard about the untimely death of one of our former friends.

Granted we had lost touch with Sue but it still was a shock to hear of her death in a car accident. In high school we used to be a “group” of five but Marie left us very early from a severe health issue. Then we were all working on marriage and kids and everything else that comes with life so we hadn’t even started to think about our mortality or getting together to celebrate old times, since those times weren’t that far in the past.

But hold on, this wasn’t supposed to get so maudlin. This year was our 2nd consecutive gathering and I was not going to miss it no matter what. That meant hobbling around on my arthritis riddled knees (coming up this fall: knee replacement ). So with drugs and a knee sleeve, I made it. Of course my besties sure made it easy. We held back on the walking (the tram around the Chicago Botanical Garden was great) and Audrey even had a small stool for getting into the back seat of the van. However the bag of frozen carrots I iced my knee with in the evenings might never be the same. The rest of the time we talked and ate, and laughed and drank, and talked and ate some more. Another year, solving all the problems in the world. We’ve all had our trials and tribulations, our health issues and setbacks, our joys and celebrations. It was good to share them. So I am ending here with some pictures that I know Audrey is going to kill me for posting. I subscribed her to my blog last week but I think I heard her say something about not wanting to see herself on it. Close your eyes Aud!!

Then: circa 1967. Looks like Aud and Lynn went to the same hair salon. Hmm, so that's what they did on those weekend outings without me.

Then: circa 1967. Looks like Aud and Lynn went to the same hair salon. Hmm, so that’s what they did on those weekend outings without me.

Now: circa 2016. Looks about the same to me except Aud and I have exchanged smiles.

Now: circa 2016. Looks about the same to me except Aud and I have exchanged smiles. (from left – Jeanne, Audrey, Lynn)