Another Turn of the Page: And Then There Were Six

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
Rainer Maria Rilke, The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge

Yes, you’ve guessed right, the Snowbirds have not returned. On top of that we have two members that keep forgetting to put our meeting time on their calendars and two others who are involved in a health study that meets at the same time. So there were six stalwart readers at last month’s round table gathering. Nevertheless, we managed to fill up the hour because we had time for discussion. When there are 14 in attendance I do have to keep everyone on task. I don’t expect March to be any larger but I do know it is always good when readers get together. 1. The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd (2001) 336 pages. A coming-to-age novel set in South Carolina at the height of desegregation. Lily is a lovable pre-teen who’d grown up believing she killed her mother (accidentally) and is trying to escape a brutal, abusive father. Lily runs away with Rosaleen, a black servant, and finds herself in the home of three black beekeeping sisters.

2. Gone by James Patterson and Michael Ledwidge (Michael Bennett series #6) (2013) 386 pages. This novel opens with the Bennett family in Witness Protection, as a crazed drug lord is after them in revenge for his wife’s death. Detective Bennett’s family is comprised of a huge clan of adopted children, Michael’s grandfather, and an Irish nanny.

3. The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware (2016) 340 pages. Laura Blacklock is a travel journalist given an assignment to cover the maiden voyage of a luxury cruise liner headed to see the Northern Lights. On her first night there she meets a mysterious woman in the cabin next to hers, cabin 10. Later that evening she hears a scream and the sounds of a body being dumped into the sea. After seeing what she thinks is blood on the neighbouring railing she reports the incident, except the cabin is empty and no-one on the ship matches the woman’s description.

4. Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly (2016) 349 pages.

5. Holy Cow by David Duchovny (2015) 206 pages. Elsie Bovary, a cow, escapes her paddock one day and instead of flirting with the bulls, she goes up to the farm house. There she learns the truth, that humans eat cows. Suddenly she realizes where her mother went…

6. Rosalie Edge, Hawk of Mercy :The Activist Who Saved Nature from the Conservationists by Dyana Z. Furmansky (2009) 376 pages. Rosalie Edge (1877-1962) was the little-known and unheralded mother of the modern conservation movement. She began life as the favorite child of an over-indulgent well-to-do father and developed into a conversationist only in late middle age. Her first significant action was to question the propriety of National Association of Audubon Societies’ close ties to ammunition manufactures and hunters when she was nearly 52 years old. She goes on to develop the Hawk Mountain Sanctuary in Pennsylvania.

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